News media – BSD News http://bsdnews.org/ Tue, 05 Jul 2022 16:29:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://bsdnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/bsd-150x150.png News media – BSD News http://bsdnews.org/ 32 32 One-on-one with Sarah Anker | TBR News Media https://bsdnews.org/one-on-one-with-sarah-anker-tbr-news-media/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 08:00:52 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/one-on-one-with-sarah-anker-tbr-news-media/ Suffolk County Legislator Sarah Anker (D-Mount Sinai) is at the forefront of several county-level initiatives. In an exclusive interview with Anker, she spoke about her positions on public campaign finance, the North Shore Rail Trail, coastal erosion and more. For those who don’t know you, can you describe your background? I am a mother of […]]]>

Suffolk County Legislator Sarah Anker (D-Mount Sinai) is at the forefront of several county-level initiatives. In an exclusive interview with Anker, she spoke about her positions on public campaign finance, the North Shore Rail Trail, coastal erosion and more.

For those who don’t know you, can you describe your background?

I am a mother of three children and a resident of Mount Sinai for 25 years. I’ve lived in Middle Island and Coram, and I’m very familiar with that area and my legislative constituency. I’ve worked at different advertising agencies, done freelance contracting work, and some local Patchogue stores. Then I left for a few years to raise my children.

When my youngest was born, the New York State Department of Health released a cancer map showing that our area had a high incidence of cancer, especially breast cancer, and my grandmother had just die of breast cancer. I decided to start a non-profit organization, the Community Health and Environment Coalition, around 2003. And that was basically to get the state to come and do an investigation, to tell us what we need to know, why we we had those numbers and where those numbers came from.

Eventually they came back into the community and did some testing, but unfortunately they left more questions than answers. We continue to investigate and try to understand the causes of cancer.

I got a job as chief of staff for [Councilwoman] Connie Kepert [D-Middle Island] to the town of Brookhaven. She lured me in and they got a $4.5 million grant for solar programs. Working with Connie, we started the programs, and then I was promoted to responsible for creating a Department of Energy at the City of Brookhaven. I left this position to run for this position.

I ran for office and was elected seven times. I’m limited in time, so I can’t run anymore. I’m a Democrat but fairly conservative — moderate and in between. I find the common denominator and focus on that. I don’t go too far left or too far right, and I’m here to represent my constituents and to calm the storm when there are problems. My top priority is public safety and the safety of my residents. I did this for my children and my family. I am doing it now for my constituents.

How did your most recent project, the North Shore Rail Trail, come to fruition?

This one was very difficult. I had to overcome major obstacles and challenges along the way.

The three main challenges were to get the county executive on board. The first was unfavorable; the current one, Steve Bellone [D], supported him. I also had to get the energy people from LIPA on board. I had worked with them extensively while managing the City of Brookhaven’s energy program and we had a good working relationship.

It worked because they were open to the idea of ​​LIPA having this as a wonderful PR project. The third was to get the community on board. The ability to see this through the fact that there had been deaths linked to people trying to bike, jog or run along our local highways. Because all of these concerns and challenges were in place, it was time to move on.

I hope, and I stress this, that people should use common sense and take responsibility for their safety when crossing intersections. But it does provide a safe place for people to recreate.

Can you tell us about the work you do with coastal erosion?

Erosion is a huge problem. I was meeting some constituents and was on Culross Drive in Rocky Point and as I walked towards a house I noticed their neighbor’s house had fallen off the cliff – literally it was down the cliff. It was 10 or 11 years ago.

I have noticed that many constituents in my area belong to beach associations. Miller Place, Sound Beach, Rocky Point – these are private beach communities, so they are not eligible for federal funding. I use the resources we have to educate them on certain seagrass beds, different brick structures, just give them ideas to try to fix it.

Unfortunately, if someone does it and that person doesn’t and that person doesn’t, it creates problems for the people who do. So I’m trying to see if we can get everyone on board to solve the erosion problem. We will do what we can.

Public campaign finance is an ongoing dispute between the County Executive and the Legislative Assembly. Can you elaborate on your position on the public campaign finance program that was repealed last week?

I support campaign finance reform. I support him. This is a program that was launched last year. We put money into it and it’s a shame we couldn’t try it. We do pilot programs all the time and I wish they could have at least done that.

It was a project that former president, Rob Calarco [D-Patchogue], had pleaded for. He worked there for a long time. I respect him and the amount of effort he put into it. I would have preferred to at least give it a try and see where it went.

If it didn’t work well or had any issues or problems, we could always have changed it. I voted for another way to fund campaigns. Any big organization that has a lot of money can create very, very empowering campaigns for any individual – and I’ve personally been there.

What is it about the communities you represent that makes them so distinct and unique?

I think we have a lot of people who understand how important it is to take an active role in their community. We have many people involved in projects, events and activities that continue to inspire people around them. Like the butterfly effect or a ripple in a stream, it continues and I see it in my community.

Right now, in this complicated political climate, we need to understand that we all have something in common and that we can all contribute to solving problems and achieving our goals by working together collaboratively. I’ve seen this and I’m doing this, and I think – whether it’s unique or not – this is something big happening in our district.

We get what we put into our community. And right now, people who have contributed and made our community better, I’m truly honored and privileged to work with those people.

Whether it’s Bobby Woods of the North Shore Youth Council or Bea Ruberto of the Sound Beach Civic Association, you really see who the real heroes are within your community when you work with them. And I feel so honored to have the opportunity to be a part of what they’re trying to create, which is a place we can call home.

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Summer Times: 2022 Summer Movies Guide https://bsdnews.org/summer-times-2022-summer-movies-guide/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 23:33:33 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/summer-times-2022-summer-movies-guide/ By Jeffrey Sanzel A a year ago, studios wondered if there would be a “return to normal”. Summer 2021 rode a mix of theater attendance and residual streaming. Delays in various releases continued throughout the fall, winter, and spring. This summer, the options seem to reflect the pre-pandemic era. Elvis Elvis is one of the […]]]>

By Jeffrey Sanzel

A a year ago, studios wondered if there would be a “return to normal”. Summer 2021 rode a mix of theater attendance and residual streaming. Delays in various releases continued throughout the fall, winter, and spring. This summer, the options seem to reflect the pre-pandemic era.

Elvis

Elvis is one of the most anticipated films. Directed by Baz Luhrman (from a script by Luhrman and others), the biopic focuses on Presley (Austin Butler) from his early career to his iconic rise. Much of the story tells of her complex relationship with Colonel Tom Parker (Tom Hanks). Lurhman is known for his non-traditional approaches (as evidenced by his Moulin Rouge, Romeo + Juliet, and The Great Gatsby), so his take will most likely reflect his unique style. Rated PG-13 Release date June 24

Minions: The Rise of Gru

Minions: The Rise of Gru offers a sequel to a spin-off. Minions (2015) followed Despicable Me (2010) and Despicable Me 2 (2013). The second film follows Despicable Me 3 (2017). For fans of the franchise, the story picks up after the events of Minions, with twelve-year-old Gru (voiced by Steve Carrell) striving to join the villains known as the Vicious 6. Rated PG Release date July 1

Thor: Love and Thunder

For those looking for the most traditional summer dishes, there is Thor: Love and Thunder (July 8), the sequel to Thor: Ragnarok (2017) and the 29th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Thor enlists the help of Valkyrie, Korg, and ex-girlfriend Jane Foster to battle Gorr the Butcher God, who is intent on making the gods disappear. Taika Waititi directs Chris Hemsworth in the title role. The film also stars Tessa Thompson, Natalie Portman and Christian Bale. Rated PG-13 Release date July 8

Where the Crawdads sing

Delia Owens’ 2018 Bestseller Where the Crawdads sing hits the big screen with Daisy Edgar-Jones as Kya, a self-raised North Carolina swamp girl who becomes the prime suspect in a murky murder case. One of the most popular novels of the past decade, this tale of secrets hidden and revealed is one of the most serious offerings. Not rated yet Release date July 15

The gray man

For those looking for action thrillers, The gray man offers the CIA’s most skilled mercenary (Ryan Gosling), uncovering dark and incriminating secrets about the organization. Chris Evans plays a psychopathic former colleague assigned to hunt him down. Produced and directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo, The Gray Man hopes to be the first in a franchise based on Mark Greaney’s Gray Man novels. Rated PG-13 Release date July 15

Nope

One of the most intriguing versions is Nope (22nd of July). Residents of a remote California town, including ranchers James and Jill Haywood (Daniel Kaluuya and Keke Palmer), witness a mysterious and anomalous event. This sci-fi horror film is written, directed and produced by Jordan Peele, whose brilliant and distinctive style always informs his work, including the highly effective get out and We. Rated R Release date July 22

Marcel the shod shell

Equally interesting is Marcel the shod shella live-action/stop-motion animated mockumentary that follows the title character (voiced by Jenny Slate) as she embarks on a journey to reunite with her family. Rated PG Release date July 24

The black phone

No summer is complete without the usual dose of horror. The black phone (June 24) reunites Ethan Hawke with Scott Derrickson, his manager since Claim (2012). Here, a kidnapped boy trapped in a basement realizes he can communicate with this kidnapper’s previous victims. Rated R Release date July 24

High-speed train

High-speed train is an action-comedy/thriller hybrid based on the Japanese novel Maria Beetle. Brad Pitt leads an ensemble cast as trained killer Ladybug (Pitt), who wants to give up on life but is restrained by her master (Sandra Bullock). On a train from Tokyo to Kyoto, competing assassins discover they are looking for the same briefcase. (There was some backlash over the film’s casting, with two of the novel’s main characters becoming non-Asian.) Rated R Release date July 29

DC League of Super Pets

The family DC League of Super Pets is an animated adventure with Superman’s dog, Krypto (voiced by Dwayne Johnson), organizing shelter pets who have special powers to free the Justice League, which mastermind Lex Luthor has captured. Rated PG Release date July 29

Body Body Body

The satirical slasher Bodies Bodies Bodies (August 5) sees a group of friends gather for a house party to play a murder mystery game, only to find that an actual murder has taken place, and they now have to play the game for real. Rated R Release date August 5

Samaritan

In Samaritan, a young boy (Javon Walton) realizes that a famous superhero, thought to be missing, may still be around. The film also stars Sylvester Stallone. Note PG-13 Release date August 26

3000 years of nostalgia

There is a surprising dearth of fantasy, with Three thousand years of nostalgia being one of the few. Adaptation and staging of the short story by AS Byatt The Djinn in the eye of the nightingale, George Miller returns after a seven-year hiatus. The epic romantic fantasy tells of a woman (Tilda Swinton) who meets a djinn (Idris Elba) who offers her three wishes in exchange for her freedom. Rated R Release date August 31

Obviously, this summer welcomes a variety of choices for all movie buffs.

*This article originally appeared in TBR News Media’s Summer Times supplement.

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Summer Times: Stony Brook Film Festival returns in July https://bsdnews.org/summer-times-stony-brook-film-festival-returns-in-july/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:09:38 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/summer-times-stony-brook-film-festival-returns-in-july/ Stony Brook University Staller Center for the Arts transforms into a cinephile mecca when new independent films are screened at the Stony Brook Film Festival on evenings and weekends from Thursday, July 21 through Saturday, July 30. The popular festival, now in its 27th year, combines memorable shorts with an array of features you won’t […]]]>

Stony Brook University Staller Center for the Arts transforms into a cinephile mecca when new independent films are screened at the Stony Brook Film Festival on evenings and weekends from Thursday, July 21 through Saturday, July 30. The popular festival, now in its 27th year, combines memorable shorts with an array of features you won’t see anywhere else, making it a favorite with moviegoers and filmmakers alike.

Presented by Island Federal, the 2022 Festival lineup features 38 films from over 28 countries. The Festival opens with the North American premiere of Peaceful, with Catherine Deneuve, Benoît Magimel and Gabriel A. Sara. A life-affirming drama about acceptance and resilience, Peaceful follows Benjamin, a terminally ill theater teacher as he navigates his final months and days. The film’s beating heart comes from Gabriel Sara – a real-life cancer specialist at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan – who plays Benjamin’s very human specialist, Dr. Eddé. Catherine Deneuve’s powerful performance as Benjamin’s mother is unforgettable.

“This year’s Festival is kind of a family affair, with several real family members making films and members of our Stony Brook family returning,” says Festival co-programmer Kent Marks. “Our independent Sunday night feature, the very touching This is a movie about my motherwhich was filmed in Ithaca, New York, stars real-life siblings Tess and Will Harrison and was written and directed by Tess.

The family theme continues with the riveting Korean independent film, Seokkarae. Written and directed by Mike Beech and starring his wife, Jiwon Lee, the character-driven film depicts a quiet 20-something trying to keep the family business going despite the difficulties. Jungle is another such collaboration, written by real-life partners Claudia Verena Hruschka and Kieran Wheeler, with Wheeler directing and Hruschka giving a heartbreaking performance in this hard-hitting short film from Australia.

From Australia to Stony Brook, the Switch is co-directed by brothers Stony Brook Ryan and Anthony Famulari. Made for almost nothing during COVID, this hilarious comedy has the brothers serving as the entire crew, with Anthony in the very funny role of a man and his clone. Two other co-directors are sisters Austin and Westin Ray with their UK-based silent thriller before seven. The Ray’s, 2014 Festival alumni, have served as directors, screenwriter (Westin) and composer and cinematographer (Austin). Another SBFF alumnus is John Gray, who won the People’s Choice award for his 2020 film Extra sleevesand returns this year with the intriguing family drama The little boy drummer.

Women will take center stage at this year’s SBFF, both in front of and behind the camera. SBFF’s opening and closing night features and shorts were all directed by female directors. In total, 17 of the 38 films of the Festival were directed by women. two movies, kitchen tales and before sevenwere made with almost all-female crews.

The Jackie Stiles Story and nassima are two completely different documentaries about female athletes from the middle of nowhere – a small town in Kansas and a small seaside village in Bangladesh – who both defied the odds and had a huge impact in their respective sports of basketball and basketball. surf.

There are heroines from all walks of life, whether in New Zealand drama Bunny King’s Justicethe israeli epic Picture of Victorythe albanian thriller Vera dreams of the seaor American indie peace in the valleyall of which feature jaw-dropping performances from their lead actresses.

Reflection on current issues, two Festival films, Olga and Berenchtein both are set in and around Ukraine, and both date from times when the Ukrainian people faced an oppressive regime, whether from the Nazis or their own government.

Mila, a must-see short film on the closing night of SBFF, is a debut effort by writer/director Cinzia Angelini and made by 350 animators from 35 countries, who volunteered their services to help Angelini realize her story after that all the major studios turned it down. Inspired by the events of the 1943 Trento bombing in Italy, this touching story depicts a young girl who has lost everything but still clings to hope.

Closing night, lost transport, is a powerful and deeply moving film set during the final days of World War II, told only from a female perspective. When German soldiers abandon a deportation train, leaving the fate of its occupants in the hands of advancing Russian troops, three women from very different backgrounds put aside their differences and work together to survive.

“The diversity of filmmakers is a hallmark of the Stony Brook Film Festival, with student filmmakers, seasoned professionals and nine budding directors represented this year,” festival director Alan Inkles said. “We are very happy to have filmmakers from all over the world join us in person this year for their first screenings. Our audience can gather in a huge theater with the largest screen on Long Island, to see movies the way they were meant to be seen. Not only are these films not available on any streaming format, but you can also hear directly from the filmmakers themselves, ask them a question during our live Q&A, and even vote for your favorite.

For 27 years, the Stony Brook Film Festival has welcomed 549 filmmakers from 78 different countries, presented nearly 55 world premieres and more than 75 American premieres. In total, the Festival screened nearly 1,100 independent films from around the world. The festival begins with an opening party and ends with an awards ceremony and a closing party.

FILM SCHEDULE

OPENING NIGHT

Thursday July 21 at 8 p.m.

Characteristic: Peacefulme France

Short: LentiniUnited States

Friday July 22 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: Olga, Switzerland, Ukraine, France

Short: kitchen talesUK

Friday, July 22 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: Global LessonsUnited States

Short: before sevenUnited States

Saturday July 23 at 4:30 p.m.

Documentation feature: The Jackie Stiles StoryWE

Saturday July 23 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: ContraGermany

Short: The little boy drummerWE

Saturday July 23 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: peace in the valleyWE

Short: raiseUnited States

Sunday July 24 at 4:30 p.m.

Documentary report: nassimaWE

Sunday July 24 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: BerenchteinIsrael and Ukraine

Short: The Switcheroo, United States

Sunday July 24 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: This is a movie about my motherWE

Short: North StarUnited States

Monday July 25 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: Take the roadIran

Short: summer of beesFinland

Monday, July 25 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: SeokkaraeKorea

Short: Save ElodieUK

Tuesday July 26 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: Hard shell, soft shellFrance

Short: almost winterUnited States

Tuesday July 26 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: Bunny King’s JusticeNew Zealand

Short: The dressUnited States

Wednesday July 27 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: Picture of VictoryIsrael

Short: MilkUK

Wednesday July 27 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: The testFrance

Short: Free fallFrance

Thursday July 28 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: Haute coutureFrance

Short: JungleAustralia

Thursday July 28 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: son of the seaSouth Africa

Short: OusmaneCanada

Friday July 29 at 7 p.m.

Characteristic: Vera dreams of the seaKosovo & Albania & Republic of Macedonia

Short: Everything that shinesUK

Friday, July 29 at 9:30 p.m.

Characteristic: Black BoxFrance & Belgium

Short: AishaGermany

CLOSING EVENING

Saturday July 30 at 8 p.m.

Characteristic: lost transportNetherlands & Luxembourg & Germany

Short: MilaUnited States

PRIZE OF THE CLOSING EVENING

10:30 p.m.

Ticket information

All screenings take place at Stony Brook University’s Staller Center for the Arts, 100 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook in the 1,000-seat Main Stage Theatre. Festival-goers can choose between a Gold Pass, a Festival Pass or an Individual Pass. Passes start at $20. All pass holders will hear from filmmakers throughout the Festival and have the opportunity to rate and vote on favorite films to help choose this year’s Festival winners.

Gold Passholders receive admission to all films, VIP reserved seating, a Stony Brook Film Festival goodie bag, discounts at restaurants and local businesses, access opening and closing nights, filmmakers’ Q&As, and the closing night awards ceremony. Festival pass holders receive admission to all films and guaranteed seats to sold-out films, Q&As with the filmmakers, access to the evening’s awards ceremony closing ceremony, discounts at local restaurants and businesses, voting for the People’s Choice Award and a gift for the Stony Brook Film Festival pass holder. For more information or to order, call 631-632-2787 or visit stonybrookfilmfestival.com.

*This article originally appeared in TBR News Media’s Summer Times supplement on June 24.

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The Roku Channel, NBCUniversal partner for local news – Media Play News https://bsdnews.org/the-roku-channel-nbcuniversal-partner-for-local-news-media-play-news/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 13:25:09 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/the-roku-channel-nbcuniversal-partner-for-local-news-media-play-news/ Local News on the Roku Channel Erik Gruenwedel June 28, 2022 On June 28, Roku announced its partnership with NBCUniversal to bring several local NBC news channels to The Roku Channel. Users will be able to access channels through The Roku Channel’s Live TV Guide. Through this partnership, NBCUniversal will offer local news channels from […]]]>

Local News on the Roku Channel

Erik Gruenwedel

On June 28, Roku announced its partnership with NBCUniversal to bring several local NBC news channels to The Roku Channel. Users will be able to access channels through The Roku Channel’s Live TV Guide.

Through this partnership, NBCUniversal will offer local news channels from its NBC stations in major U.S. markets including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Dallas/Fort Worth, Washington DC, Hartford (CT) and South Florida, for The Roku Channel. Additional NBCUniversal channels will be added in the coming months. The partnership marks the first time local news programming will be available on The Roku Channel.

“Audiences are increasingly choosing to consume news through streaming, and local news has always been one of the most requested categories by our users,” said Ashley Hovey, head of The Roku Channel, AVOD, in a statement.

The channels will feature the latest local news, latest updates, weather forecasts and live events from that designated area. The addition of the channels will complement The Roku Channel’s existing suite of national news options, which includes NBC News Now, making local and national news easily accessible to audiences.

Subscribe HERE FOR FREE Media Play News Daily newsletter!

“Local news has never been more vital in helping our audience stay informed about what’s happening in their communities,” said Meredith McGinn, executive vice president of diginets and original production for NBCUniversal Local.

NBCUniversal Local is Comcast’s local media division serving English and Spanish speaking and bilingual audiences in 31 US markets and Puerto Rico. The division is made up of three individual media groups, including the NBC Owned Television Stations Group, the NBC Sports Regional Networks and the Telemundo Station Group. The division also houses the multicast networks LX News, COZI TV, TeleXitos.

The Roku Channel offers a lineup of over 80,000 free movies and shows and 300 linear TV channels in the US, plus subscription streaming video from over 50 content partners. It licenses and distributes content from over 250 partners.

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Financial media praise LeBron James https://bsdnews.org/financial-media-praise-lebron-james/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 03:53:06 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/financial-media-praise-lebron-james/ If you’ve ever been forced to interview someone for a segment or an article, you know pretty quickly when it’s going to be a bumpy ride. Joe Pags answered my initial questions as freely as Ebeneezer Scrooge distributed Krugerrands. Teeth were removed from the human head with greater ease. It just wasn’t happening. After a […]]]>

If you’ve ever been forced to interview someone for a segment or an article, you know pretty quickly when it’s going to be a bumpy ride.

Joe Pags answered my initial questions as freely as Ebeneezer Scrooge distributed Krugerrands. Teeth were removed from the human head with greater ease. It just wasn’t happening.

After a few minutes, I think I grew on him.

I discovered that we actually had a few things in common; we both lived in Lake Worth, Florida, we knew a lot of the same places and the same faces, and we both understood that the summer heat in Florida is like purgatory.

However, Pags and I will both have an affectionate devotion to The Noid. We will always share the memories of being a manager at Domino’s Pizza.

“I’ve worked at Domino’s when the pizzas were delivered to your door within 30 minutes, or it was free,” Pags said. “After a while they went 30 minutes or three dollars off the price. Too many people got into accidents trying to beat time. »

What Pags didn’t mention is that even when you legitimately got it done in under 30 minutes, you had people questioning your delivery time. I guess it’s human nature.

Soon pizza was just for eating, not for working; Pags began his radio career in 1989 in Palm Beach County, Florida.

After that, it was a stint as a television presenter from 1994 to 2005 in Saginaw, Michigan, then Albany, New York. From there he was called back to radio and landed at the Clear Channel Talk Flagship, WOAI, in 2005. The Joe Pags Show has been a fan favorite since its debut in 2007.

For Pags, the media dream started very early.

“I grew up listening to talk radio at a very young age and was determined to make a living doing it one day,” says Pags. “I actually have a tape somewhere where I erased the DJ’s vocals and recorded my own over the songs.”

Pags is probably glad the tape never aired.

Years later, he found he could pay the bills doing something he loved. “I’m lucky to work with great people on both local and national radio and television,” Pags explained.

As a child, Pags listened to Neil Rogers on WIOD. It was consistently a top-rated show in Miami – Fort. media market in Lauderdale and has done so since its beginnings in Miami in 1976.

“I also remember Steve Cain, Rick and Suds on that station,” Pags said. “It was a lot of talk radio, but it was fun. It was entertainment. Rush Limbaugh was in politics at the time.

Pags knew a career in the media was for him since he was ten years old, even before his vocal cords did.

“When my voice changed at 13, I developed a deeper tone; I knew I was on my way. I had a New York accent and I had to get rid of it.

Before embarking on a career in radio, his music career was going well. Pags played French horn and saxophone; apparently he was pretty good.

He gave concerts at the prestigious Breakers Hotel, among many others. “I used to play in the Backstage Lounge adjacent to the old Burt Reynolds Dinner Theater in Jupiter,” Pags said.

It’s unclear if Reynolds has ever caught Pags live or not.

As a child, he played baseball. Pags said he was pretty good. What took center stage for Pags was the music. It was the French horn and the saxophone that captured his heart.

“I played professionally on the Empress Dinner Cruise on the Intracoastal Waterway,” Pags said. “I also did gigs at the Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach. We made a lot of money.”

Before Domino’s, radio and music, it all started with a strong desire to succeed. This often comes from the trust your family has in you. Sometimes it’s not there.

“I knew if I worked hard enough, if I showed love for the work I was doing, then I would be successful,” Pags said.

His family lived in Lake Worth, Florida from 1973 to 1974, and Pags returned from time to time. “I went back to Florida recently when I went to Mara Lago and watched 2,000 mules.

San Antonio has been home to Pags and his family for 17 years. “I’ve been here at WOAI. I have my own studio in a great neighborhood. His daughter Sam is his executive producer. I asked Pags if there was any nepotism when it came to hiring Sam.

“It’s true, there is nepotism,” he said. “It’s Joe Pags media. I can hire whoever I want,” he joked. “Sam has always loved broadcasting. When I joined this company, I told him I trusted him more than anyone I knew and asked him to produce my show.

The other day I spoke with Will Cain for a song. He told me that if I visited Austin, I should also see Texas. So I asked Pags what Cain was trying to say. “He means Austin is a city like Portland; only it’s in Texas. There is a lot of homelessness in Austin. Lots of crime. The University of Texas at Austin goes far left.

Where does Pags’ tough behavior come from?

“My father was 100% Italian. We ate great pasta dishes at our house with my grandparents,” Pags explained. “We didn’t have a good bakery in Lake Worth, so I remember my mom and aunts bringing great bread recipes from home.”

Pags has always been interested in what happens on the periphery, not just at the heart of things. He did many things throughout his life. This experience helped shape his radio show. Pags said his show tended to be white-collar, but he grew up as a blue-collar.

“I liked Superman movies. I enjoyed Rocky,” Pags explained. “As a car lover, I loved Burt Reynolds movies with Smokey and the bandit. Stuff like that.”

Lake Worth, like many other areas of Florida, is known to be a bit rough and tumble. just look Cops for a week if you don’t believe me.

Pags said that other than a little scramble at the bus stop, he didn’t encounter a lot of rough stuff. “I was a musician, I was not in this mix. Maybe a little league fight.

When he was a teenager, he thought music would be that. “I had played with a few heavy hitters back then, like The Coasters,” Pags said.

“Career opportunities in music haven’t really turned out the way I hoped. In some ways, people in the industry were full of it. I still did freelance work on the saxophone.

Pags said he was always willing to work for what he had. “I served coffee and ran errands for $4 an hour,” Pags said. “I had my car repossessed and I was evicted from my apartment. I still stuck to it. I was never deterred from what I wanted. I knew what I wanted, but I didn’t really expect things to turn out the way they did.

Pags said if a young person asked how to be what Pags is today, their answer was succinct. “Pour coffee, run errands, whatever you have to do.”

I asked Pags what he does in his spare time? Let’s say he’s not racing at the 7:00 start with the guys at the club on his day off.

“I’m a national sports car guy,” he says proudly. “I have three Corvettes, a Camaro Super Sport. My Camaro was a 1967, red with white stripes. I sold this car so we could adopt our daughter. I got the most out of this deal.

He doesn’t race weekends at local tracks like other aging Indy contenders. “I love watching these cars in the garage,” Pags said. “My dad was a big car lover. My dad is probably the reason I was successful in my life and my career. Not for the reasons you think.

Pags’ relationship with his father had its typical ups and downs. As is the case with most men.

“My dad didn’t think I would stand for anything and had no problem telling me this,” Pags said. “Conversely, my mother was always extremely supportive of my interests and goals. I knew that if you were good at what you did, people would notice.

Pags said his father excelled at being an opponent. A glass is a half-empty type.

“He was so negative. He thought I would never achieve anything,” Pags explained. “I was out of the house at 17 and determined to become something. To prove him wrong.

Before his father died, Pags thinks his father realized a lot.

“A light went on in his head, and he was so surprised that I could make a living doing what I was doing,” says Pags. “When I became quite successful, he recognized my drive and determination. I still don’t know if he was tough on me because he thought it would help me in the end. Whatever his reasoning, it gave me the motivation and the determination to go all the way.

Pags’ father became so proud of his son that he told his friends Joe was going to be on Fox News and how they should tune in.

“It was my mother, with her ultimate support, who really inspired me to succeed. For her,” Pags explained.

“I learned that if someone puts you down or makes you feel small, you have a choice. You can go into a shell and take it. Believe what people say. Or you can go out and knock down doors. If you want me to do something, tell me I can’t do it. Soon I’ll be unionized on 200 stations. This all came from believing in me. I’m going to prove it to iHeart. To other broadcasters.

Pags once said; you need to find some sort of edge.

“I knew I was not going to agree with what my father believed and said, just to shut him up. I had to defend my own convictions.

I can relate to a guy like Pags. It has a hard exterior, not easy to break. But like me, I know that at the center is a soft, creamy nougat.

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Children’s rights body includes ‘news media’ in draft guidelines https://bsdnews.org/childrens-rights-body-includes-news-media-in-draft-guidelines/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 18:28:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/childrens-rights-body-includes-news-media-in-draft-guidelines/ The National Commission for the Protection of the Rights of the Child (NCPCR) has, for the first time, included a new category – “children in the news media” – in its draft guidelines to regulate the portrayal of children in entertainment and media. The children’s rights body also recommended stricter rules to protect children’s interests, […]]]>
The National Commission for the Protection of the Rights of the Child (NCPCR) has, for the first time, included a new category – “children in the news media” – in its draft guidelines to regulate the portrayal of children in entertainment and media. The children’s rights body also recommended stricter rules to protect children’s interests, particularly in the way their interviews and visuals are broadcast on television.

The NCPCR cited greater accountability on social media as well as video streaming platforms to prevent child abuse. “Since the last guidelines were issued in 2011, many changes have been made, in particular amendments to the Juvenile Justice Act, child labor laws, the Protection of Children from Harm Act 2012, Sexual and Information Technology Offenses (Intermediate Guidelines and Digital Media Code of Ethics) Rules, 2021,” NCPCR Chairman Priyank Kanoongo told ET. “The guidelines have been amended to incorporate the new laws.”

The draft is available for public comment. It says news media and production companies must be extremely careful when talking to child victims of rape and other sexual offences, trafficking, abuse, runaways, organized crime and children in armed conflicts and those in conflict with the law. “They should be considered anonymous for life… the media should not sensationalise stories related to children and should be aware of the harmful consequences of highlighting information about them that can harm children,” he says. .

Interviews with children should not be conducted frequently and no adult related to the child should be coerced into having the child talk, according to the draft guidelines. The body recently objected to the use of children at a protest rally organized by the Indian Popular Front and demanded a response from state authorities.

On OTT platforms, the NCPCR has made it clear that no child should be placed in a role or situation that is inappropriate, or that could upset them or put them in an embarrassing situation, other than “ensure that no child does not smoke, drink or engage in any substance abuse or delinquent behavior.”

The body also specifically put the ball in the court of intermediaries, saying the new IT rules are clear about how they should become aware of content that violates child protection laws.

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Media Responds to Supreme Court’s Overturning of Roe v. wade https://bsdnews.org/media-responds-to-supreme-courts-overturning-of-roe-v-wade/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/media-responds-to-supreme-courts-overturning-of-roe-v-wade/ The former high school coach who spearheaded the Supreme Court’s decision on postgame prayer, joined “The Faulkner Focus” to discuss Monday’s decision. According to Fox News Digital, the issue centered on whether a public school employee praying alone but in full view of students was engaging in unprotected “government speech.” Joe Kennedy was a varsity […]]]>

The former high school coach who spearheaded the Supreme Court’s decision on postgame prayer, joined “The Faulkner Focus” to discuss Monday’s decision.

According to Fox News Digital, the issue centered on whether a public school employee praying alone but in full view of students was engaging in unprotected “government speech.”

Joe Kennedy was a varsity assistant coach at the Bremerton School District in Washington from 2008 to 2015.

“You know, I really don’t know what to say. I just can’t help but smile and, you know, thank God and thank everyone who supported me, and I found out that I wasn’t crazy,” he said. in a transcript obtained by Barrett News Media. “That’s absolutely true of all the facts of the case, and it feels good to know that the First Amendment is alive and well.”

Kennedy said he was motivated to return to the field and coach again. “As soon as they – the school district says, ‘Hey, come back,’ I’m there. Absolutely. First game.

Kelly Shackelford, CEO of the First Liberty Institute, joined the conversation. She reiterated that both free speech and free exercise are protected by the First Amendment.

“So if the government is going to violate that and in that case really fire him because he exercised his First Amendment rights, they have to have some kind of very serious justification for that, and they had nothing like that,” she added.

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Canadians’ trust in news media hits new low https://bsdnews.org/canadians-trust-in-news-media-hits-new-low/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 23:06:06 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/canadians-trust-in-news-media-hits-new-low/ According to the Reuters Institute’s Digital News Report 2022, trust in Canadian news media has fallen to its lowest level in seven years. The study, produced by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford, found that trust in the news has fallen 13% since 2016. Only 42% of Canadian […]]]>

According to the Reuters Institute’s Digital News Report 2022, trust in Canadian news media has fallen to its lowest level in seven years.

The study, produced by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford, found that trust in the news has fallen 13% since 2016. Only 42% of Canadian respondents trust “ most of the news, most of the time”. a slight drop from 45% last year.

Canadian respondents were asked if they trust the news most of the time: 47% of Francophones trust the news, compared to 39% of Anglophones. In 2022, Canada: n=2,012; Anglophones: n=1,486; Francophones: n=1,004.
(2022 Digital News Report/The Reuters Institute, Center for Media Studies)

As in previous years, the study found that Francophones trust news and information sources more than Anglophones, although both groups trust the news less than ever before.

The study also showed that age is a major factor in how much respondents trust information, with trust being higher among respondents aged 35 or older than among young adults. This finding is consistent with previous research. Young people tend to consume less news in general and rely more on social media and other digital platforms for information.

Media independence

English-speaking Canadians expressed less confidence this year in the independence of the news media from political and commercial influence. On the other hand, the beliefs of Francophones in the independence of the media remain stable compared to previous years.

Bar graph showing the number of Canadians who agree that the news media is free from political influence and commercial influence.  The graph shows that more Francophones believe in both statements than Anglophones.
Canadian respondents were asked whether they thought the news media in Canada was mostly independent of undue political and commercial influence.
(2022 Digital News Report/The Reuters Institute, Center for Media Studies)

English speakers who identify with the political right are more likely to be skeptical of media independence. Moreover, half of Canadians consider the mainstream media to be politically close to each other. Of those who consider news outlets very close, only 21% trust the news.

Although the question was added to measure public perceptions of polarization in the media landscape, this finding instead suggests that the perceived lack of diversity in media ownership and outlook is one of many causes of mistrust.

Consumer habits reflect these negative opinions: the number of people who actively avoid news, at least occasionally, has increased from 55% in 2017 to 71%.

The most cited reasons why people avoid the news lately include negative effects on mental or physical health, too much news on topics like politics or COVID-19, and exhaustion from the amount of news available. .

A graph showing how many Canadians are actively trying to avoid the news
Respondents were asked if they actively try to avoid the news these days: 71% of respondents said they had.
(2022 Digital News Report/The Reuters Institute, Center for Media Studies)

More people pay for news online

The study offers some silver linings for news agencies. Two years ago, the Digital News Report revealed that more Canadians were paying for news online. This number is now at its highest level since 2016. This is promising for the future of independent and popular media.

Canadians who pay for news are also more likely to subscribe or donate to more than one news source. Many Canadians expect their online media subscriptions to increase rather than decrease. Still, more than half said their media subscriptions are likely to stay the same.

However, subscriptions to online news services are still much less popular than entertainment platforms such as TV or music streaming services, podcasts, audiobooks and sports.

A line graph showing that every year more and more Canadians are paying for news content online
The number of Canadians who have paid for news content online or accessed a paid online news service in the past year.
(2022 Digital News Report/The Reuters Institute, Center for Media Studies)

Journalism in times of crisis

Although the survey was conducted in a time of crisis in January and February – during the ‘Freedom Convoy’ protests in Ottawa – most of the report’s findings follow multi-year trends and are consistent with the Digital News’ global findings. Postponement.

It is possible that government support programs for the news media, such as federal tax credits, are linked to more negative perceptions of the media.

Certainly, these funding programs have allowed much-needed Canadian news media to recover financially, in addition to increasing advertising revenue during the pandemic.

But they have also drawn criticism and fueled concerns about the independence of journalists.

Media regulation

Governments are becoming increasingly active in regulating digital media ecosystems and supporting local journalism to protect democracies from disinformation and misinformation.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine, which began shortly after this investigation was completed, intensified pressures in this regard due to widespread misinformation about the invasion on social media.

In this time of upheaval and transformation, surveys like the Digital News Report contribute to our understanding of the relevance and legitimacy of professional news sources from the public’s perspective. Factual analysis of changing consumption and attitudes of news users can support the development of public policies as well as better journalism practices.

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Nature Matters: Ospreys and Eagles https://bsdnews.org/nature-matters-ospreys-and-eagles/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 20:38:10 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/nature-matters-ospreys-and-eagles/ By John L. Turner I vividly remember the first time I saw an Osprey (also called a Fish Hawk due to the fact that its diet is, with very few exceptions, entirely fish). When I was ten years old, a friend and I were birdwatching at the back of Miller’s Pond in Smithtown, now a […]]]>

By John L. Turner

I vividly remember the first time I saw an Osprey (also called a Fish Hawk due to the fact that its diet is, with very few exceptions, entirely fish). When I was ten years old, a friend and I were birdwatching at the back of Miller’s Pond in Smithtown, now a county park off Maple Avenue, but at the time a private estate. We walk along the edge of a small stream that feeds the pond, still somewhat hidden by a grove of pepper bushes. Looking across the creek, we noticed a HUGE bird (isn’t everything bigger when you’re little?) perched on top of a dead tree with a wriggling orange object in its legs. Well, the object was a nice sized carp, the legs were actually very sharp talons, and the big bird holding the carp was an osprey.

Ospreys have made an incredible comeback on Long Island. Photo not splashed

We didn’t realize it at the time, but this Osprey sighting was becoming an increasingly rare occurrence. Due to the widespread use of DDT, a persistent pesticide that can persist in the environment for decades, ospreys and many other birds higher up the food chain (e.g. bald eagles, two species of pelicans, the peregrine falcon) fell. Scientists quickly learned that the pesticide was interfering with the birds’ ability to lay viable eggs, causing some bird populations to decline by up to 90% and causing the extinction of the Eastern Peregrine Falcon breed. United States.

Fortunately, in one of the first major environmental victories of the environmentally-enlightened era of the early 1970s (you may be old enough to remember the first Earth Day and the passing of the water quality, air quality and endangered species), DDT was banned in 1972 for use in the United States. The center of this intense national struggle? Right here in the Three Villages where the Environmental Defense Fund (FED) was created!

Now an international environmental organization focusing on global environmental issues such as climate change and biodiversity loss, EDF began in a modest office, first in Stony Brook (in a cramped office on the second floor above from the post office, ironically, behind the flying bald eagle) and then to a house in Setauket on Old Town Road, where he successfully led the fight to stop the use of this bird-killing pesticide. This struggle of several years is chronicled in the very informative and readable book DDT wars, written by Charlie Wurster, a retired Stony Brook University professor, EDF board member and longtime Old Field resident.

Over the past two decades, ospreys have rebounded across North America with an estimated 30,000 pairs (making the continent the species’ global stronghold), an increase mirrored on Long Island with several hundred osprey pairs and growing (as a result the osprey was removed from the New York State Endangered and Threatened Species List).

The presence of several species of coastal fish, including the gaspereau, the American eel, but especially the menhaden (or bunker) which has experienced a resurgence in the last half-decade due to the ban on their harvesting trade in New York State waters, is helping to fuel this growth. .

As with an animal that regularly dives into the water to catch very slippery prey, ospreys have developed a number of adaptations that provide the tools for a successful hunt. Their sharp talons help hold fish, but their feet have two other adaptations. The skin on the bottom of their feet is riddled with small bumps called spicules that give the skin a sandpaper-like quality, helping the bird grasp fish. And the osprey can rotate one of its three front talons to swing backwards so the bird can better cling to the fish with a two-front, two-back talon arrangement . Oh, and did I mention that they close their nostrils to keep water out when they dive in search of prey?

Their plumage, too, is adapted to immersion in water. Ospreys have the oiliest feathers of any bird of prey, the oil helping to repel water. This oil imparts a musty smell to museum hides, a trait that museum curators have sometimes noted. After taking off from a dive, ospreys almost always shake their bodies like a golden retriever, as water drops easily fall off their highly waterproof feathers.

Their bulky stick nests are a common and iconic site in many coastal areas of Long Island, sometimes built in sturdy trees, others on buoys, lighthouses, or channel markers. Most often, however, nests are on raised platforms that a benevolent person or organization has erected (if you are installing a nesting platform, be sure to install a predator guard and one or several perches angled from the side of the platform).

From the ground it is difficult to see the outline of the nest, but from above you can discern its shallow bowl-like shape, containing softer materials such as phragmites, finer sticks and even algae, lining the bowl. Ospreys are known to add man-made objects to their nest with dozens of items documented; we don’t understand why they do this; maybe they just like collecting things like ropes, bits of netting, rubber boots, clothes, even children’s dolls!

Osprey chicks in various stages of development are now found in nests all around Long Island. Both parents incubate the eggs (two to three in a typical clutch, although sometimes a nest of four eggs is reported). If hatchlings survive wind and rain at their exposed nest sites, they grow rapidly and fledge in about two months. If you want to watch ospreys go through nest building, incubation and rearing the young, there are a number of webcams online to view ospreys.

PSEG has two productive webcams, one at Oyster Bay and the other on the south side of Main Street in Patchogue Village. As I write this, I listen to the piercing call of an adult osprey vocalizing from the webcam nest at Oyster Bay; two little young have hatched and there is an unhatched egg which will hopefully hatch very soon. The two youngsters in Patchogue’s nest are several days older.

Bald eagles have made an incredible comeback on Long Island. Photo not splashed

A larger cousin of the Osprey – the Bald Eagle – is another beneficiary of the DDT ban, and as the eagle has resurfaced across the country, so has Long Island. Due to this population growth, the species was removed from the federal endangered species list in 2007, although it is still listed as a threatened species on the New York DEC list. Although largely free of pesticide contamination problems, many bald and golden eagles today face poisoning from a different source – lead. Lead is ingested from spent shot, bullet fragments, and possibly even long-lost fishing sinkers first ingested by the waterfowl they were feeding on.

Sightings of adult and immature eagles have become almost commonplace, especially near areas where they nest. The first eagle’s nest, evidence of this return, was discovered on Gardiner’s Island in 2006 and was for several years the only nest on Long Island. (In fact, before the current resurgence, the last bald eagle nest was on Gardiner Island in 1932.) But by 2015 the number of nests had increased to five, and by 2018 it had reached eight. There are now more than a dozen nests. The Centerport nest, just north of State Route 25A and west of the harbor, is perhaps the most visible. Good views of the William Floyd Estate Eagle’s Nest can be had, looking south across Home Creek, from Osprey Park in the town of Brookhaven.

As with the scientific name of many species, the bald eagle’s scientific name gives information about the species; Haliaeetus leucocephalus means the bald sea eagle.

The resurgence of these two awe-inspiring birds of prey in recent decades has been inspiring, not only for the grace, power and beauty they add to our daily experience, but also because they are living proof that if we do the right things – banning poisons (let’s take the next step in restoring them by working with hunters to eliminate lead!), cleaning up our country’s waters, protecting their food supply and provide nesting sites – these birds and nature can begin the healing process and meet us halfway. These birds present, indeed, teach us an important and valuable lesson in this time of planetary peril. It’s up to each of us to learn from them – what do you say, are you ready to accept the lesson?

A resident of Setauket, John Turner is conservation chair of the Four Harbors Audubon Society, author of “Exploring the Other Island: A Seasonal Nature Guide to Long Island” and president of Alula Birding & Natural History Tours.

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Do you contribute financially to online news media? https://bsdnews.org/do-you-contribute-financially-to-online-news-media/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 23:21:51 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/do-you-contribute-financially-to-online-news-media/ Please note that the Tyee Barometer polls are only intended to be a quick and engaging non-scientific snapshot of our readers’ opinions on various topics that fall within The Tyee’s very broad editorial mandate. They are not intended to be taken as a representative sample of British Columbia opinion. The landscape of online news media […]]]>

The landscape of online news media has changed dramatically over the past decade, if not the past few years. Today we live in a media environment that is very different from that once dominated by the printed daily newspapers.

Today, reader support is crucial to the sustainability of journalism.

Most online news media are free, which encourages financial support from readers while remaining accessible to everyone. Some media use a paywall, so only those who can afford it have access. While most online media relies in part on advertising, some sites are so riddled with ads that it can be difficult to read their articles.

At The Tyee, we believe in a robust journalistic landscape made sustainable by the support and investment of our readers. We thank everyone who can contribute.

But we realize we’re not the only publication with this approach, and others have different templates to reflect their audience. So with that in mind, we want to ask:

Do you contribute financially to online news media?

* Please note that all survey responses will be publicly viewable, but anonymous.


Please note that the Tyee Barometer polls are only intended to be a quick and engaging non-scientific snapshot of our readers’ opinions on various topics that fall within The Tyee’s very broad editorial mandate. They are not intended to be taken as a representative sample of British Columbia opinion.

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