News media – BSD News http://bsdnews.org/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:27:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.2 https://bsdnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/bsd-150x150.png News media – BSD News http://bsdnews.org/ 32 32 Editorial – Another broken promise: Hochul excludes media from northern hospital visits | Editorials https://bsdnews.org/editorial-another-broken-promise-hochul-excludes-media-from-northern-hospital-visits-editorials/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 05:15:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/editorial-another-broken-promise-hochul-excludes-media-from-northern-hospital-visits-editorials/ When politicians start talking about their transparency after taking office, you can bet they won’t be that transparent. Kathy Hochul pledged to usher in a “new era of transparency” when she became governor in August. But recent events cast doubt on this claim. On his first visit to our region as governor, Hochul excluded members […]]]>

When politicians start talking about their transparency after taking office, you can bet they won’t be that transparent.

Kathy Hochul pledged to usher in a “new era of transparency” when she became governor in August. But recent events cast doubt on this claim.

On his first visit to our region as governor, Hochul excluded members of the media from his Wednesday meetings with health workers at Canton-Potsdam Hospital in Potsdam and Samaritan Medical Center in Watertown. She also chose not to hold any press briefings during her stay, so reporters couldn’t ask her questions about what people were telling her about the novel coronavirus pandemic.

This tight travel schedule was made possible on a private plane – it’s not like she has to wait for a connecting flight at Syracuse Hancock International Airport. We find it hard to believe that she couldn’t answer reporters’ questions by visiting at least one of those two hospitals.

Hochul found time in his tight schedule to hold a press conference at Clinton Community College in Plattsburgh. She visited the pop-up vaccination clinic organized that day, organized by the state health ministry and SOMOS Vaccinations at the college, an article published on Wednesday by the Republican Press reported.

The Watertown Daily Times asked why its local visits were closed to the press: “Wednesday’s briefing in Plattsburgh was broadcast live and the governor responded to reporters’ questions via video conference on Monday, officials from the Hochul office said.” , according to our article.

Live and video conference events are certainly useful for journalists to remotely cover government meetings. During this healthcare crisis, it has been crucial to have alternative methods to visualize such gatherings.

But neither option has benefited us this week.

We were unable to ask Hochul questions on Monday about what health workers told her when she was here two days later. And being able to watch her live in Plattsburgh is good, except we weren’t there to question her about her time in Potsdam and Watertown.

This pandemic, which has lasted for nearly two years, continues to puzzled government officials, public health officials, medical staff and residents of New York state. Many of us are very concerned about the latest developments and how they will affect our well-being.

So people are wondering what the state government is doing to address these issues. Those of us in the news industry take on the role of asking these questions of our elected officials as often as possible.

In this sense, Hochul has dismissed the fears of local residents by not allowing us to do our job. She should submit to the scrutiny of the press – it is part of her job as a person in public office.

When we think it’s necessary, we’re going to ask him tough questions and blame him for his mistakes. This governor shouldn’t expect to get a pass.

However, Hochul doesn’t need to take any extra hits from us to exclude journalists from local events. Her presence here is certainly newsworthy, but we can’t report what’s going on if she keeps us on the other side of closed doors. Need he be reminded of how keeping the operations of the Executive Chamber in secret helped end the career of former Governor Andrew Cuomo?

If she truly believes in transparency, Hochul must take the concerns of local residents seriously by making herself available to journalists when she visits our communities. Otherwise, his promises of open government will ring as hollow as those of his predecessor and his colleagues in Albany.

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Opinion KT: Can Europe save its local news media? – News https://bsdnews.org/opinion-kt-can-europe-save-its-local-news-media-news/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 17:07:38 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/opinion-kt-can-europe-save-its-local-news-media-news/ The European Commission has announced that it will introduce the European Media Freedom Act next year to help preserve pluralism in the local press as traditional media continue to fight online competition. By Jon Van Housen and Mariella Radaelli Posted: Wed 22 Dec 2021, 21:07 Last update: Wed 22 Dec 2021, 21:08 Although some wonder […]]]>

The European Commission has announced that it will introduce the European Media Freedom Act next year to help preserve pluralism in the local press as traditional media continue to fight online competition.



By Jon Van Housen and Mariella Radaelli

Posted: Wed 22 Dec 2021, 21:07

Last update: Wed 22 Dec 2021, 21:08

Although some wonder if it is not too little too late, the European Commission has announced that it will introduce the European Media Freedom Law next year intended to help preserve pluralism in the local press while as traditional media continue to struggle against online competition, often from dominant tech giants. .

Long considered fundamental to European democracies, local newspapers continue to suffer from declining revenues, while many that have managed to survive so far are no longer able to fully perform their function of providing well-edited articles. to an informed population. The result is a political regime with possible fake news online or information lacking the depth needed in a complex world.

Thierry Breton is the European Commissioner whose portfolio charges him with protecting the small and medium-sized enterprises of the bloc, and that includes local media companies. He told the European News Media Forum held at the end of last month that the aim of the media freedom law would be to guarantee the integrity and independence of the EU media and realistic access. to the income necessary for their survival.

“We want to strengthen media pluralism and improve the resilience of the sector as a whole,” he said. “We want to act against all types of unwarranted interference in the activities of our media companies.”

A veteran opponent of Big Tech media domination, Breton has been aggressive enough in his mission that Google has one day planned to discredit him, which has led to an apology from the CEO of Google’s parent company Alphabet of the Year. last.

After an internal memo was made public, CEO Sundar Pichai apologized and promised that such tactics are “not the way we operate.” He said that he was never shown the plan and that he did not approve it.

Today, Breton continues his mission, claiming that the proposed new law “is a matter of European sovereignty – as you may have heard me say on several occasions, everything is geopolitical. Information, far from being an exception, is a textbook case ”.

But with online giants taking up to 80 percent of advertising revenue in certain markets, what can the EU do to help save its local media?

Legislation intended to thwart political interference and prevent takeovers by a few large media groups is widely welcomed by politicians, media and NGOs, but some wonder why it is taking so long and worry about its success. Implementation.

The challenge is not only the competition in the market, or the lack of it, but also the evolution of the readership. In Germany, only 37% of people viewed printed newspapers once a week in 2018. That number has now fallen to 26%. More than half (54%) of Europeans now receive information from their smartphone.

As the traditional readership declines, the media are forced to go online and scramble to find a viable source of income. With a huge number of clicks required to generate even a modest income, many outlets fail to find a business model that works. The desperate attempt to garner clicks can also lead to sensational “click bait” stories that could spread fake news.

And it could even have fatal consequences. As the need and appetite for reliable information became crucial during the Covid-19 pandemic, it was clear that adequately resourced and funded media professionals were an absolute necessity. Now is not the time to use home remedies or share fear-motivated exaggerations.

With questionable information sometimes shared online, it has become clear that Europeans place more trust in mainstream media, Breton said. Leading the recent forum on the issue, he said the EU must “react and ensure that citizens can access reliable, quality and independent information, including online”.

He announced that with the financial support of the EU, 16 national news agencies from across Europe would join together under one roof to create the so-called European press room.

The European Commission has also earmarked € 75 million to support media freedom and pluralism projects through 2027, although it is unclear how this may affect newspapers in small towns.

Often, faced with the giant bureaucracy of the EU, it is the big institutions that have the staff and the training to guide them. The smallest operations, the very definition of diversity, often leave empty-handed or give up before they’ve even hired the dreaded EU juggernaut. Much of the available EU grants go unclaimed each year at many levels.

And that’s a thin line to walk in a free capitalist system. Where bad business habits end and legitimate needs begin, it can be difficult to find a threshold.

Yet Commissioner Breton and his colleagues are to be commended for their efforts. Online social media has indeed created a new world. Tech giants don’t want to be held accountable as the media, but they are the ones who siphon revenue from small media companies and they are the ones who often facilitate the spread of fake news.

At the turn of the 20th century, the United States had to find a way to curb predatory practices and thus broke Standard Oil. Much later, Bell Telephone was deemed too dominant and was therefore split into smaller companies.

In addition, the United States allocates and licenses the limited number of radio and TV frequencies available, and requires licensees to adhere to standards of fairness and ethics.

Thus, governments have shown that they can intervene when the situation is clearly out of balance. Many would say we’ve hit that tipping point with online news as well. Self-checking will probably not be enough.

Just like they did with online privacy, it’s time for the EU to set the standard for media diversity. In a world of “likes” and selfies, we also need careful and careful consideration of an increasingly complex world.

Let’s make sure to share this idea.

Jon Van Housen and Mariella Radaelli are senior international journalists based in Milan

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The media’s obsession with sausage making isn’t helping anyone https://bsdnews.org/the-medias-obsession-with-sausage-making-isnt-helping-anyone/ Sun, 28 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/the-medias-obsession-with-sausage-making-isnt-helping-anyone/ Thanksgiving is all about the turkey, of course. But lately the mainstream media has been obsessed with something else: sausages – and how they’re made. Another term for this is “process report” – a breathtaking coverage of every little twist and turn in the way legislation is made and sold. An Internet search for “Democrats […]]]>

Thanksgiving is all about the turkey, of course. But lately the mainstream media has been obsessed with something else: sausages – and how they’re made.

Another term for this is “process report” – a breathtaking coverage of every little twist and turn in the way legislation is made and sold. An Internet search for “Democrats + Biden + Sausage” returns over half a million results.

This kind of journalism is nothing new. But it got more extreme, to the point that it really helps anyone.

To be fair, Democrats are doing all they can to encourage this kind of coverage. In fact, they seem to revel in the mess. Immediately after the House voted for the Build Back Better bill, the Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiA Tale of Two Tax Policies: What Motivates the Senate Asian American leaders push for national museum of their own Biden, lawmakers mourn Harry Reid MORE (D-California) reminded reporters, “It’s called the legislative process” – as if all the very public shutdowns, starts, ups and downs of the past few months are proof that things are working well and not falling apart.

President BidenJoe Biden FDA clears second rapid home COVID-19 test Pentagon awards $ 6.7 million contract for domestic production of essential material for rapid COVID-19 testing, celebrating the adoption of the bipartite infrastructure bill, proclaimed to White House reporters: “Finally, the sausage is done.”

The mainstream media has enthusiastically embraced the making of sausage by Democrats for one main reason: all of this protein feeds their beast. In digital journalism and the 24/7 wired news environment, every moment is a deadline, every second of airtime must be met.

When hard facts are scarce, backstage gossip is a practical substitute. Like a treadmill that never stops, this endless amount of rumor allows the media to continue to label a story as “development” or, better yet, “disruption”.

This creates a unique sausage-making synergy. Yes, the reporting process feeds modern journalism’s insatiable thirst for new material. But it also presents certain types of politicians with something they crave: plenty of opportunities on camera. One side encourages the other. And that continues the story of the cliffhanger “process”: will the bill pass? What is it, what is it? Who has weight? Who doesn’t?

For a Senator or House Member, there is no glory in dealing with disagreements behind the scenes until a resolution is reached – not when a group of cameras and reporters stand in every hallway. Capitol Hill, eagerly looking for anything they can instantly publish online or broadcast live on cable news.

If you have an outsized ego – which is apparently not unusual in Washington – this is a perfect arrangement.

And, after all, who suffers from it?

Lots of people do. They are called “voters” or, sometimes, “average citizens”.

Journalists justify the reporting process by insisting that it brings transparency to Capitol Hill and the White House. Even Shalanda Young, President Biden’s interim budget director, told a media: “Frankly, a lot of Americans have said they want to see sausage making up close and personal.”

But do they really do it? Not that way.

Transparency is good, but it’s a continuous whirlwind of prefabricated conflict and outrage in capital letters that turns every detour into a crisis that should not be touched on this dial… until the next disaster strikes. on top of a new cable news hour.

Americans are exhausted. Over the past 20 years, they have faced terrorist attacks, two wars, an economic collapse, a deadly pandemic, and an attempt to overthrow a presidential election with a deadly attack on the Capitol. Polls consistently show that Americans are pessimistic on almost all institutions, starting with politics and national leadership.

A relentless focus on the process – which is actually a relentless focus on a few personalities – sheds no light on this obscurity. Instead, it causes this deep feeling that things are not on the right track.

It is an axiom among some journalists that the “process” does not matter to many voters on election day; they just don’t follow it that closely. That’s right – and part of the problem. Voters may not hang on to every change in sausage making, but there is a trickle down effect. In the evening news broadcasts, on their Facebook feeds and cell phones, they get just enough coverage to conclude that democracy is still broken and will probably never be mended.

A poll two weeks ago showed that a solid majority of respondents support both Biden’s infrastructure package and Build Back Better. But Biden’s approval rating was at a new low – a drop due not to Republicans, but Democrats and Independents. It seems Americans love the legislation – but all of this sausage reporting even gives Biden supporters a big case of heartburn. They just filled it up.

It is time to take a look back at this kind of journalism, or at least the incredible amount that is currently being produced. To some extent, this contributes to a damaging perception that things are falling apart. Considering what the nation went through on January 6 and is still trying to cope, it’s not hard to see this needs to change.

Over a century ago, the German statesman Otto von Bismarck Said, “To keep sausages and the laws respected, you don’t have to watch them while they’re being made.” “

At least for a little while, maybe the media can feast on leftover turkey. And take Bismarck’s advice: stop staring at the sausages.

Joe Ferullo is an award-winning media executive, producer and reporter and former executive vice president of programming for CBS Television Distribution. He was news director for NBC, writer-producer for “Dateline NBC” and worked for ABC News. Follow him on twitter @ ironworker1.

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Fox Corporation Appoints Stephen Potenza Deputy Legal Director of FOX News Media | New https://bsdnews.org/fox-corporation-appoints-stephen-potenza-deputy-legal-director-of-fox-news-media-new/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/fox-corporation-appoints-stephen-potenza-deputy-legal-director-of-fox-news-media-new/ LOS ANGELES, October 26, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Fox Corporation (Nasdaq: FOXA, FOX) today announced that Stephane Potenza joined the company as deputy general counsel of FOX News Media. Potenza will report to Bernard gougar, general counsel and executive vice president of corporate development for FOX News Media. The FOX legal group has also […]]]>

LOS ANGELES, October 26, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Fox Corporation (Nasdaq: FOXA, FOX) today announced that Stephane Potenza joined the company as deputy general counsel of FOX News Media. Potenza will report to Bernard gougar, general counsel and executive vice president of corporate development for FOX News Media. The FOX legal group has also strengthened its team with the promotion of Lisa richardson to the Executive Vice President of Commercial and Legal Affairs and Associate General Counsel. Richardson will continue to report to Adam reiss, Executive Vice President and Assistant General Counsel of Fox Corporation.

Potenza joined FOX News Media from Kirkland & Ellis LLP, where he was a partner in litigation groups as well as government, regulatory and internal investigative groups. He has represented clients from a wide range of industries in complex litigation and investigations. Potenza was previously at Bancroft PLLC where he specialized in cases before the Supreme Court of the United States and advised clients on a wide range of issues, including advising start-ups and established companies on legal matters. affecting daily operations. Previously, Potenza was a litigation lawyer for Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP. Potenza was a paralegal for the Hon. Reena raggi to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and for the Hon. William G. Bassler in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey. He obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Union College and a Juris Doctor from Georgetown University Center of Law.

“I am very happy to welcome Steve to FOX News Media, where he will be a vital part of our legal team,” said Gugar. “He brings an impressive and extensive experience in government, litigation and business.

Lisa richardson joined FOX in 2005 and most recently served as Senior Vice President of Commercial and Legal Affairs and Associate General Counsel. She manages the legal elements of FOX content distribution, overseeing the legal team advising the FOX distribution team, and has been instrumental in negotiating and drafting content distribution agreements on a wide variety of platforms including cable, satellite, fiber, over-the-top (OTT), authenticated and on-demand streaming. Previously, she was a lawyer at Gemstar-TV Guide and Richardson began her career at Latham & Watkins LLP. She obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of California, Berkeley, and his Juris Doctor of USC Gould Law School.

Reiss added, “Lisa is a valued member of my team who provides thoughtful and strategic advice regarding distribution agreements and company relationships. I look forward to his continued growth in this new role.

Fox Corporation General Counsel Jeff Taylor commented, “We are building a world class legal organization at FOX and look forward to continuing to attract and retain top talent like Steve and Lisa. “

About Fox Corporation

Fox Corporation produces and distributes compelling news, sports and entertainment content through its iconic national brands, including: FOX News Media, FOX Sports, FOX Entertainment and FOX Television Stations. These brands have cultural significance for consumers and commercial significance for distributors and advertisers. The breadth and depth of our footprint allows us to deliver content that engages and informs audiences, build deeper relationships with consumers, and create more engaging product offerings. FOX maintains an impressive track record of success in the information, sports and entertainment industry that shapes our strategy to capitalize on existing strengths and invest in new initiatives. For more information on Fox Corporation, please visit www.FoxCorporation.com.

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fox-corporation-names-stephen-potenza-deputy-general-counsel-of-fox-news-media-301408961.html

SOURCE Fox Corporation

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The public and the media can attend the jury selection of Ghislaine Maxwell https://bsdnews.org/the-public-and-the-media-can-attend-the-jury-selection-of-ghislaine-maxwell/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/the-public-and-the-media-can-attend-the-jury-selection-of-ghislaine-maxwell/ A judge on Thursday rejected British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell’s proposal to bar the public and media from jury selection at her New York trial on charges she recruited teenage girls for financier Jeffrey Epstein to for the purpose of sexual abuse. U.S. District Judge Alison J. Nathan told reporters and the public will be allowed […]]]>

A judge on Thursday rejected British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell’s proposal to bar the public and media from jury selection at her New York trial on charges she recruited teenage girls for financier Jeffrey Epstein to for the purpose of sexual abuse. U.S. District Judge Alison J. Nathan told reporters and the public will be allowed to view the selection proceedings next month via video streams to a crowded courtroom and courthouse press room. She said two reporters from the pool would be allowed into the courtroom as she questioned potential jurors. been put in place due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Journalists’ Committee for Press Freedom, a consortium of journalists and more than a dozen news agencies wrote to the judge on Wednesday opposing the defense’s request to select jurors in secret. all know that there has been intense media and public interest in this matter. … These procedures will secure First Amendment public access rights, as necessary and required by law, ”Nathan said on a pre-trial conference call. Nathan also denied a defense request to block the public from seeing the blank questionnaire that will be given to around 600 people who will be called as potential jurors in the high-profile case. 12 lead jurors and six alternates are scheduled to start on November 4, with opening statements scheduled for November 29. When selecting the lead jurors, the defense will have 10 peremptory challenges and the prosecution will have six, Nathan said. For the substitutes, each part will have three challenges. Maxwell’s lawyers have argued to question potential jurors behind closed doors, as they may be asked to disclose sensitive information, such as if they have been sexually abused. Nathan said she would make adjustments on a case-by-case basis to “ensure the frankness of the jurors and the confidentiality of the jurors on the project.” prejudices, difficulties, personal relationships and knowledge of the case will lead people to find their way through the jury process. She likened it to a “home exam” in which jurors could fill out the answers they felt would best position them for selection. Nathan, who will be conducting an individual follow-up questioning Nov. 16-19 with potential jurors who survive the quiz phase, replied, “If a swear lies and is dishonest, we’re going to smoke this.” And the fact that this questionnaire is publicly documented will neither increase nor decrease such probability. Maxwell, whose father was a British press baron, pleaded not guilty to charges of recruiting teenage girls from 1994 to 2004 to be sexually abused by Epstein in encounters sometimes described as sexualized massages. A revised indictment filed in March included allegations that she had prepared a 14-year-old girl to recruit other young women in exchange for money. Epstein committed suicide in a Manhattan federal dungeon in August 2019, a month after his arrest for sex trafficking. Maxwell, 59, joined the conference call Thursday from an empty room at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, where she has been held since her July 2020 arrest in New Hampshire. She didn’t say much except to complain about the bad connection on the call and to assure the judge that she was still on the line when another communication mishap occurred. Previous cover: Judge sets Ghislaine Maxwell trial start date Judge seeks answers for Ghislaine Maxwell’s prison treatment

A judge on Thursday rejected British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell’s offer to bar the public and media from jury selection in her New York trial on charges she recruited teenage girls for financier Jeffrey Epstein to for the purpose of sexual abuse.

United States District Judge Alison J. Nathan said the press and the public would be allowed to view the selection proceedings next month via video streams to an overwhelmed courtroom and press room at the courthouse. She said two reporters from the pool would be allowed into the courtroom as she questioned potential jurors.

In deciding the matter, Nathan said she is working to balance the public’s right to access court proceedings with health measures, such as adding extra space between parties, which have been put in place due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The Journalists’ Committee for Press Freedom, a consortium of journalists and more than a dozen news agencies wrote to the judge on Wednesday opposing the defense’s request to select jurors in secret.

“We are all aware that there has been intense media and public interest in this matter.… These procedures will secure First Amendment rights to public access as necessary and required by law,” said Nathan on a pre-trial conference call.

Nathan also rejected a defense request to prevent the public from seeing the blank questionnaire that will be given to around 600 people who will be called as potential jurors in the high-profile case.

The selection of 12 lead jurors and six alternates is expected to begin on November 4, with opening statements scheduled for November 29. When selecting the lead jurors, the defense will have 10 peremptory challenges and the prosecution will have six, Nathan said. For alternates, each side will get three challenges.

Maxwell’s lawyers have argued to question potential jurors behind closed doors, as they may be asked to disclose sensitive information, such as whether they have been sexually abused. Nathan said she would make adjustments on a case-by-case basis to “ensure juror candor and project juror confidentiality.”

Maxwell’s attorney, Bobbi Sternheim, said letting the public see the blank version of the questionnaire, which is used to screen the jury panel for bias, hardship, personal connections and knowledge of the case, will lead to people pushing their way through the jury process. She likened it to a “home exam” in which jurors could fill out the answers they felt would best position them for selection.

Nathan, who will be leading one-on-one follow-up questions Nov. 16-19 with potential jurors who survive the quiz phase, replied, “If a juror is going to lie and be dishonest, we’re going to smoke this. And the fact that this questionnaire is publicly documented will not increase or decrease such probability. “

Maxwell, whose father was a British press baron, pleaded not guilty to charges of recruiting teenage girls from 1994 to 2004 to be sexually abused by Epstein in encounters sometimes described as sexualized massage. A revised indictment filed in March included allegations that she prepared a 14-year-old girl to recruit other young women in exchange for money.

Epstein committed suicide in a Manhattan federal dungeon in August 2019, a month after his arrest for sex trafficking.

Maxwell, 59, joined the conference call Thursday from an empty room at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, where she has been held since her July 2020 arrest in New Hampshire. She didn’t say much except to complain about the bad connection on the call and to assure the judge she was still on the line when another communication incident occurred.

Previous coverage:

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Fox News Media signs 6-pound contract with HarperCollins https://bsdnews.org/fox-news-media-signs-6-pound-contract-with-harpercollins/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 15:26:22 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/fox-news-media-signs-6-pound-contract-with-harpercollins/ Fox News Books, the publishing house of Fox News Media, has reached a deal with HarperCollins to publish six new titles, doubling their original contract to three titles. “We are delighted to partner again with HarperCollins, further expanding the FOX News Media multiplatform brand,” Suzanne Scott, CEO of Fox News Media, said in a statement. […]]]>

Fox News Books, the publishing house of Fox News Media, has reached a deal with HarperCollins to publish six new titles, doubling their original contract to three titles.

“We are delighted to partner again with HarperCollins, further expanding the FOX News Media multiplatform brand,” Suzanne Scott, CEO of Fox News Media, said in a statement. “Over the past 25 years, we’ve developed a unique connection with our audience and look forward to delivering more of the content they want from their favorite FOX News personalities through our extensive publishing platform. “

The initial three-book deal will end in November with the release of “All American Christmas”. Written by “Fox & Friends Weekend” co-host Rachel Campos-Duffy and her husband, Sean Duffy, Fox News contributor, the book will present “a look at how the family of 11 is celebrating the holidays, showcasing their favorite memories and traditions with stories and photos over the years.

“All American Christmas” is also expected to spotlight other Fox News personalities including Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, Brian Kilmeade, Bill Hemmer, Dana Perino, Martha MacCallum, Geraldo Rivera, Lawrence Jones, Jesse Watters, John Rich, Charles Payne and others. . Everyone will share their own stories and memories of the holiday season celebration.

The network first entered the publishing space in November last year, announcing the move in celebration of Fox’s 24th birthday and launching themselves with a three-book deal with Harper Collins, owned by Murdoch. These titles included “Modern Warriors” by Pete Hegseth and “The Women of the Bible Speak” by Shannon Bream. The latter book remained in the New York Times bestseller list for 15 straight weeks, scoring five weeks in the # 1 spot.

A number of Fox News and Fox Business hosts and presenters have written books before, including Sean Hannity, Bret Baier, Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, and Martha MacCallum.

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FOX News Media Signs Six-Book Deal with HarperCollins As Part of FOX News Book Platform Expansion https://bsdnews.org/fox-news-media-signs-six-book-deal-with-harpercollins-as-part-of-fox-news-book-platform-expansion/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/fox-news-media-signs-six-book-deal-with-harpercollins-as-part-of-fox-news-book-platform-expansion/ “All American Christmas” with Rachel Campos-Duffy and Sean Duffy to be released in November NEW YORK, October 14, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – FOX News Books, the publishing company of FOX News Media, has signed a new agreement with HarperCollins to publish six new titles, said Suzanne Scott, CEO of FOX News Media. The new deal […]]]>

“All American Christmas” with Rachel Campos-Duffy and Sean Duffy to be released in November

NEW YORK, October 14, 2021– (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – FOX News Books, the publishing company of FOX News Media, has signed a new agreement with HarperCollins to publish six new titles, said Suzanne Scott, CEO of FOX News Media. The new deal follows the platform’s resounding success, delivering back-to-back bestsellers during its debut in publishing.

During the announcement, Ms. Scott said: “We are delighted to partner again with HarperCollins, in order to continue expanding the FOX News Media multiplatform brand. Over the past 25 years, we have developed a unique connection with our audience and look forward to delivering more content than they desire from their favorite FOX News personalities through our extensive publishing platform. “

Starting in November, All American Christmas will be the third title of the imprint. Written by FOX & Friends Weekend co-host Rachel Campos-Duffy, along with her husband, FOX News contributor Sean Duffy, the book will provide a look at how the family of 11 is celebrating the holidays, showcasing their favorite memories and traditions with stories and photos over the years . Additionally, the Duffys will also be spotlighting several FOX News personalities, sharing their favorite vacation memories including stories from Steve Doocy, Ainsley Earhardt, Brian Kilmeade, Bill Hemmer, Dana Perino, Martha MacCallum, Geraldo Rivera, Lawrence Jones, Jesse Watters, John Rich, Charles Payne and many more.

As one of the eight platforms in the FOX News Media footprint, FOX News Books launched last November with Pete Hegseth Modern Warriors followed by Shannon Bream’s Women of the Bible speak, which was released in March 2021. Together, the platform’s first foray into publishing has sold around 800,000 copies in less than a year. Notably, while both titles have placed at the top of all national bestseller lists, Women of the Bible speak appeared on the New York Times bestseller list for 15 consecutive weeks, scoring five weeks in first place.

Through this new agreement, FOX News Books will continue to work with HarperCollins to develop personality-focused headlines as well as creative concepts around key themes important to FOX News Media audiences. As the home of some of the best-selling bestselling authors in the news industry, FOX News Media has become a leader in propelling titles to the top of the charts. Notably, Bret Baier, Tucker Carlson, Janice Dean, Mark Levin, Dana Perino, Chris Wallace, and Jesse Watters all released national bestsellers in this calendar year, which is more than any other TV news organization.

FOX News Media operates FOX News Channel (FNC), FOX Business Network (FBN), FOX News Digital, FOX News Audio, FOX News Books, the direct-to-consumer digital streaming services FOX Nation and FOX News International and the upcoming AVOD platform- FOX weather form. Currently the number one network in all cable, FNC has also been the most-watched television news channel for almost 20 consecutive years, while FBN currently ranks among the top commercial cable channels. Owned by FOX Corporation, FOX News Media reaches 200 million people every month.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211014005791/en/

Contacts

FOX News media contacts:
Caley Cronin: 212-301-3972
Jessica Ketner: 212-301-3976

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One-third of Americans say they don’t trust the news media https://bsdnews.org/one-third-of-americans-say-they-dont-trust-the-news-media/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/one-third-of-americans-say-they-dont-trust-the-news-media/ Americans’ trust in the news media fell to second lowest on record, with one-third of the public saying they had “no confidence,” according to a new Gallup poll. When it comes to reporting news in a complete, accurate and fair way, 29% of Americans said they had “not much” confidence in newspapers, television and radio, […]]]>

Americans’ trust in the news media fell to second lowest on record, with one-third of the public saying they had “no confidence,” according to a new Gallup poll.

When it comes to reporting news in a complete, accurate and fair way, 29% of Americans said they had “not much” confidence in newspapers, television and radio, while 34% said n ‘have “none”.

In addition, only 7% said they had “a lot” and 29% said they had “quite a lot” of trust in the media. The combined 36% is down four points from last year’s poll and just four points above the 2016 record. Tracking began in 1972.

Between 1972 and 1976, 68 to 72% of the public trusted the American media. In 1997, the number fell to 53 percent.

Since then, Americans’ trust in reporting has averaged around 45%, according to Gallup. Confidence in the mass media has not exceeded 50% since 2003.

A third of Americans say they have “no faith at all in the media,” according to a new Gallup poll. Pictured above is a “disinformation booth” in Manhattan on October 30, 2018, which aimed to educate readers about fake news in the run-up to mid-term.
ANGELA WEISS / AFP via Getty Images

Gallup reported that the “divisive presidential election campaign” between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton contributed to a record low of 32% five years ago.

However, in the two years since the election, confidence in the media has increased by 13 points. Gallup attributed the growth to Democrats’ response to media scrutiny of the Trump administration, but the number started to drop again in 2018, as everyone began to lose faith in reporting.

Yet trust in the media differs considerably depending on an individual’s political party.

According to Gallup, 68% of Democrats said they trust the media a lot or a lot. Among independent voters, the figure is 31%, and 11% of Republicans said they had the same level of confidence. Between the two major parties, the gap has been between 54 and 63 points since 2017.

Over the past year, the confidence of Democrats and Independents has changed by five points, but Republicans have remained steadfast. Since 1996, the GOP’s confidence in fair dealing has not exceeded 52 percent. In the new poll, 60% of Republicans said they had no faith in the media.

For Democrats, confidence hasn’t fallen below the 2016 reading of 51%, according to Gallup. The independents have not reached the level of the majority since 2003.

Just over 1,000 adults living in the United States were interviewed for the study, conducted between September 1 and September 17. at all, to a lot.

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Peter Mansbridge Says Media’s Biggest Threat Is Public Lack Of Trust https://bsdnews.org/peter-mansbridge-says-medias-biggest-threat-is-public-lack-of-trust/ Fri, 01 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/peter-mansbridge-says-medias-biggest-threat-is-public-lack-of-trust/ With Canada’s journalism industry facing a host of challenges – falling incomes, disappearing jobs, lack of diversity in newsrooms – former CBC chief correspondent Peter Mansbridge says his biggest threat today is lack of confidence. “You just have to look at the ratings that come out every few months in different parts of the world […]]]>

With Canada’s journalism industry facing a host of challenges – falling incomes, disappearing jobs, lack of diversity in newsrooms – former CBC chief correspondent Peter Mansbridge says his biggest threat today is lack of confidence.

“You just have to look at the ratings that come out every few months in different parts of the world on confidence, in terms of different professions, and for journalism, they’ve gone down,” Mansbridge said. Sunday magazine host Piya Chattopadhyay.

“It’s not as low as politicians, but it’s low, and yes we can’t afford it to be low,” he said.

According to a recent Ipsos poll, Canadian public confidence in news media increased from 72% in 2019 to 66% in 2021, especially for traditional sources like broadcast television and print newspapers.

Mansbridge, is seen here at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards where he accepted a Lifetime Achievement Award. (Peter Power / Canadian Press)

In other report by the communications firm Edelman, 49 percent of Canadians polled agreed that “journalists and reporters deliberately try to mislead people by saying things they know to be false or grossly exaggerated.”

“If we don’t have the trust of our audience – you know, the viewers, the listeners, the readers. If we don’t have that trust, we have nothing,” Mansbridge said. “Journalism is built on credibility. Credibility is built on trust and truth. And we face a challenge on the trust factor.”

Despite the resignation of The Nationalanchor chairman of in 2017, Manbridge has continued to work, from hosting special events at the CBC and election coverage to hosting his own news podcast The bridge.

He is currently publishing an autobiography entitled Off the Record, to be released on October 5, sharing stories from his 50-year career in journalism.

The only known photo of Mansbridge on CBC in Fort Churchill, Man. (University of Toronto Archives)

“Simon and Schuster wanted to call it memories. And I said, ‘No, no, that sounds like some kind of near-death experience,’” he said. “I don’t want that. I just want anecdotes, you know, and I’m not done yet.”

Among his memorable moments is an interview with legendary musician and personal friend Gord Downie, as well as a thorny interview with former UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

Peter Mansbridge with Margaret Thatcher

In this 1993 interview, Margaret Thatcher sits down with Peter Mansbridge to discuss the principles of leadership. 3:39

But he says if he started today his career would be very different.

“Well I would watch a life of baggage handling,” Mansbridge said, referring to the story of how it was discovered while working at the Churchill, Man., Airport in 1968. The manager of the local CBC station, Gaston Charpentier, offered him a job as a host of a nighttime radio show after hearing his voice over the speaker.

Mansbridge acknowledges that since then the field has become very competitive, especially following the Watergate scandal of the 1970s, which attracted more people to the profession.

Mansbridge speaks with Tragically Hip frontman Gord Downie in 2016. It was Downie’s first interview since being diagnosed with cancer. Downie died in 2017. (Lara Chatterjee / Jean-François Bisson)

“If this job were open today, there would be 200 people lined up for this job. Then there was nobody,” he said. “So my life would have been very different.”

He says young journalists who are trying to be successful today should “be determined”.

“Pick a goal. Know what you want to do … and don’t give up,” he said, recounting that he himself was turned down three times before he was finally offered a journalist job for The National.

Mansbridge meets Pope John Paul II. Throughout his five-decade career, Mansbridge has met and interviewed leaders and personalities from around the world. (The Vatican)

When it comes to the broader journalism industry, Mansbridge says working to earn public trust is essential. He says the news media need to be “much more transparent” about how they make their decisions.

Whether it’s how we decide what’s news and what isn’t, why one item gets so much more time than another, how we determine who is worthy of anonymity in sourcing, ”he said.


Written by Althea Manasan. Interview conducted by Tracy Fuller.

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Zeldin, elected officials mobilize against hospital vaccine mandates https://bsdnews.org/zeldin-elected-officials-mobilize-against-hospital-vaccine-mandates/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://bsdnews.org/zeldin-elected-officials-mobilize-against-hospital-vaccine-mandates/ Congressman Lee Zeldin (R-NY1) joined health workers to boycott Governor Kathy Hochul (D) ‘s vaccination deadline on September 27. Zeldin, who is campaigning for governor, joined other elected officials outside the state building in Hauppauge on Monday, just hours before health workers were required to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before midnight or risk losing their […]]]>

Congressman Lee Zeldin (R-NY1) joined health workers to boycott Governor Kathy Hochul (D) ‘s vaccination deadline on September 27.

Zeldin, who is campaigning for governor, joined other elected officials outside the state building in Hauppauge on Monday, just hours before health workers were required to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before midnight or risk losing their job.

On Monday evening, Hochul signed an executive order to dramatically increase the eligible workforce and allow additional health workers to administer COVID-19 tests and vaccinations.

According to the mandate, if healthcare workers do not receive at least one dose of one of the COVID-19 vaccines by the end of the day on Monday – without medical dispensation or having already requested a religious dispensation – they will lose their jobs.

The congressman spoke on mandates, at local and national levels.

“Our healthcare workers have been nothing short of heroic over the past 18 months,” Zeldin said. “We should not be laying off these essential workers. We should thank them for everything they have done for our communities.

Zeldin called on Hochul to work with medical institutions and state health workers to “implement a more reasonable policy that does not violate personal freedoms, fire the health workers who have helped us through the worst days of pandemic and cause chaos and staff shortages at hospitals and nursing homes.

Hochul said this week that to fill vacant hospital positions, she plans to bring in the National Guard and other out-of-state health workers to replace those who refuse to be vaccinated.

“You are either vaccinated and can keep your job, or you are on the streets,” said Zeldin, who is vaccinated.

State Senator Mario Mattera (R-St. James) said he was angry when healthcare workers were given limited ability to negotiate the vaccine mandate through their unions.

“It’s not a state of emergency, like a hurricane,” he said. “It’s a state of emergency where people are made redundant and will not have unemployment insurance. I am a union leader. It is a shame for all Americans.

According to the state’s Department of Labor, unvaccinated workers who are made redundant will not be entitled to unemployment insurance benefits. A new Republican-led bill introduced in Albany would restore those unemployment benefits.

On Tuesday, the state released data noting that the percentage of hospital staff receiving at least one dose was 92% (as of Monday night) based on preliminary self-reported data. The percentage of people fully vaccinated was 85% on Monday evening, compared to 84% on September 22 and 77% on August 24.

“This new information shows that firmly holding the vaccine mandate for healthcare workers is simply the right thing to do to protect vulnerable family members and loved ones from COVID-19,” Hochul said in a statement. . “I am happy to see health workers getting vaccinated to keep New Yorkers safe, and I continue to monitor developments and stand ready to take action to alleviate potential situations of staff shortages in our systems. health.”

Long Island’s three health care providers have already implemented the mandate and are taking action.

Northwell Health, the state’s largest private employer and healthcare provider – and which includes Mather Hospital in Port Jefferson and Huntington Hospital – previously informed all unvaccinated team members that they no longer complied with New York State’s mandate to immunize all healthcare workers by the September 27 deadline.

Northwell regrets losing an employee in such circumstances, but as medical professionals and members of the state’s largest healthcare provider, we understand our unique responsibility to protect the health of our patients and each other. of others, “Northwell said in a statement. “We owe it to our staff, our patients and the communities we serve to be 100% vaccinated against COVID-19. “

Catholic Health Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer Jason Golbin said in a statement the supplier is “incredibly proud of the dedication of our staff to protecting the health and safety of the people of Long Island during the COVID-19 pandemic. and is grateful for their heroic efforts over the past 18 months.

He added, “In keeping with our commitment to ensuring the health and safety of our patients, visitors, medical staff and employees, we respect New York State’s mandate to immunize all healthcare workers.”

Golbin said that as of Tuesday, September 28, the vast majority of staff were fully immunized with only a few hundred people on leave at six hospitals, three nursing homes, home health care, hospices and other practices. medical.

Stony Brook University officials added that Stony Brook medicine has prepared for the New York state mandate, all healthcare workers receive at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. ‘here is the deadline.

As of 8 p.m. on September 28, 94.07% of Stony Brook Teaching Hospital employees have been vaccinated, and that number continues to rise, 134 Stony Brook Teaching Hospital employees are suspended without pay and will have to meet working relations. representatives to discuss their situation. While waiting for this meeting, they can use vacation or time off. If they continue to choose not to receive the vaccine, they will be terminated as per the NYS DOH order.

Less than 1% of the total population of hospital employees are on probationary employment and although they are currently suspended without pay, they are still eligible to be vaccinated before their dismissal is processed and could always go back to work.

Officials said those numbers are fluid and expect further declines.

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